2Minister H

Photo  shows Minister Heather Humphreys with the McAree Management Team of David Caraher, Vincent McAree, Brendan McAree, Claire McAree and Peter Richardson

McAree Engineering, has announced upwards of 30 new roles which they plan to fill early in 2020. 

The company which already employs 145 staff across its three factories in Ballinode and Carrickroe, North Monaghan made the announcement

a week after they signed a Strategic Partnership agreement with Kilnaleck based, Breffni Air.

“We have invested some €5M in facilities and new capability in the past 18 months and this will continue with an additional investment of €2m in 2020. 

With Breffni Air, we are commencing a long term HVAC ducting project  which will allow us to get the most from this investment and

we are absolutely delighted to  announce  these additional jobs for North Monaghan ” added Brendan McAree, Managing Director

Welcoming the announcement, Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation added

“Huge congratulations to McAree Engineering on this fantastic news, which will come as a huge boost to North Monaghan and the wider region. 

They are a shining light for homegrown rural businesses right across the country, proving that you don’t have to be in a big city to achieve big success. 

The positive impact that they have on the local area cannot be underestimated and I would like to wish Brendan and the team the very best in the exciting chapter ahead.”

Vincent McAree, Operations Director stated “we have collaborated with Breffni Air for almost 20 years on a number of projects so it made sense to formalise this arrangement. 

We share the same vision of excellence in engineering, have similar values and are both growing rapidly. 

This partnership will allow us to grow the businesses using each other’s complementary strengths. 

We will focus on major industrial HVAC projects which is the driver behind today’s job announcement and will collaborate on a range of new projects”.

HR Manager, Katharine Slowey advises “we have a range of roles available from Design Engineers, CNC Machine Operators,

Assembly Operatives and Fabrication Welders and, we are looking to fill them early in the New Year. 

We are also looking to improve the gender balance in McAree Engineering and would love to see more women apply for these roles. 

We are a 3rd generation family business and have a strong focus on health and safety whilst at the same time operating

a friendly work environment offering excellent rates of pay. 

We believe in ongoing training and offer all our team members the opportunity to work with high-end machines and equipment. 

Full details of the roles are available on our website www.mcaree-eng.com.

Editor’s Note

McAree Engineering has been based in Ballinode since 1946 when the company was set up by Brendan’s father, Vince. 

They are best known for designing and manufacturing the V-Mac Silo range of Bulk storage solutions mainly for the agricultural sector. 

While this is an important part of the business, it accounts for only around 20% of turnover.

They have invested euro millions in state of the art lasers and press brakes, operating one of the most modern suites of sheet metalworking machinery in Ireland and Britain.

They supply components into leading Own Equipment Manufacturers across the island of Ireland in the quarrying and screening, materials handling and agricultural machinery sector.

2Cow on point of calving

   

 

Without urgent corrective action, some dairy and suckler beef herds will face calving problems over the next three months

as a legacy of plentiful high-quality grass last summer, according to Dr Elizabeth Berry BVSC, PhD, MRCVS, Veterinary Director with Animax.

She says a recent and widespread rise in calving difficulties identified by the Scottish Agriculture College (SAC) adviser Basil Lowman

indicates that many cows are carrying surplus weight into late pregnancy. The SAC in Scotland is the equivalent of Teagasc

Research from Teagasc shows that as BCS (body condition scores) increases above moderate levels, calving difficulty can increase.

This occurs as over-conditioned cows have increased calving difficulty due to fat being deposited in the pelvic area.

According to Teagasc, cows with a BCS >3 can afford to lose between 0.5 and 1.0 BCS through restricting the allowance of good-quality silage

or farmers can feed moderate-quality (65% DMD) silage ad-lib or dilute the energy of the diet by incorporating straw.

Very thin cows have increased calving problems.

This is due to insufficient strength to withstand the birth process and giving birth to weak, non-vigorous calves.

Thin cows need to be prioritised and allowed free access to good-quality silage and/or supplemented with concentrate,

where good-quality silage is not readily available.

To avert problems before they arise, Elizabeth advises farmers to focus on body condition scores and trace element supplementation leading up to and during the dry period.

But before making any changes, she insists that farmers discuss them with their vet or specialist feed adviser.

For trace element status, Elizabeth Berry says all farmers will know from past experience whether their soils are copper deficient and that supplementation is needed.

"But for other trace elements, it isn't as obvious," she says. "Many deficiencies are subclinical and not easily noticed.

Among the losses they cause are calving difficulties, weak calves, impaired fertility and reduced milk production."

Among a variety of methods including drenches, free access licks or in-feed powders,

Elizabeth suggests that continuous-release, long-duration supplementation is easy and reliable.

"For example, Tracesure cattle boluses lodge in the base of the rumen, releasing a trickle-charge of essential selenium, cobalt and iodine,

with or without copper depending on the farmer's choice, for up to six months ."

She reports that farmers' comments are typically encouraging: "Since giving these boluses at drying off," said one such,

"our cows are in much better condition at re-breeding three to four months later. As a result, the herd calving interval has certainly improved."

All Animax boluses have been independently trialled by Teagasc.

For further information please visit https://animax-vet.com/products/roi/

or contact Rory Dicker, Commercial Manager, Tel: 087 063 5950   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

 

2 Desmond

Photo by Fergal O'Gorman shows from left are Ashling & Brian Desmond, Contractor Jim Deasy & Seamus O’Callaghan, Durapak Agri.

The results of the CSO December 2019 Livestock Survey show that the provisional estimate

for the total number of sheep was 3,908,300 an increase of 109,800 on December 2018.

The number of dairy cows increased by 56,700 (+4.1%) while cattle 2 years and over (excluding cows and bulls) increased by 23,000 (+5.2%).

According to DAFM data dairy cow numbers as of1  March were up by 5%.

Overall, the total number of calves registered so far this year amounts to 1,649,787 head compared to 1,585,221 in 2019.

Surprisingly the number of beef calves registered as 1 May has also increased by 3.3 %.

Calf exports from the Republic of Ireland up to the week ending May 5 to other EU destinations are well behind 2019 levels, according to the Dept of Agriculture.

So we will need a lot more silage available for feeding to livestock next winter and spring.

Making extra silage is not an option on many farmers and it is an unwelcome extra expense.

However, one solution is to minimise storage loses for baled silage conserved.

Jerome Desmond, his wife Majella and their son Brian operate a dairy farm at Garryhesta, Ovens in Co. Cork. 

This is a family farm where son Tom and daughter Aisling also help out at weekends and during holiday time.

Brian aged 21 years was educated at Clonakilty Agricultural College and also worked on a large dairy farm for six months in New Zealand. 

Milk from their mixed herd of 130 Holstein Friesian and Jersey x cows is supplied to Dairygold Co-op.

The average yield for this spring calving herd is 6,500 litres (over 1.400 gals) and milk is produced mainly from top quality grazed grass.

This farm is on dry land and they budget for a three-month winter but make plenty silage to cover for the possibility of an early winter, late spring or summer droughts.

They make 70 acres of first cut clamp silage and 40-50 acres of a second cut. Around 450 bales of silage are also made by their local baled silage contractors Aidan Deasy and his son Jim.

Aidan and Jim operate two McHale Fusion3 Plus balewrappers and they give their customers a choice of using netwrap or Baletite.

They own Aherla Farm &Plant Hire and do silage work for around 50 local farmers.

According to Aidan, 90% of their customers have now switched from netwrap to Baletite.

Jim says that this is “because the silage preserves better, bales are easier to handle and less subject to damage when they are moved.”

“They give us a very good service, “says Brian. Baletite costs €1 more per bale and is referred to as balewrap by farmers and their contractors.

The Desmonds have been using Baletite now for two years and are very satisfied with the silage quality.

According to Jerome “we have 100% perfect preservation whereas with the netwrap there was some wastage around the outside of the bale. 

Another plus is that it can be disposed of along with the wrap.”

According to Seamus O’Callaghan from Durapak Agri in Ballincollig the local supplier for Baletite

“it is an innovative pre-orientated film that replaces netwrap in round silage bales.

It is specifically designed to enhance the ensiling process and protect the bale contents.”

Lloyd Dawson, Commercial Director Silage with Berry bpi agriculture  the manufacturers of Baletite says that “being a film,

Baletite provides an additional air barrier whilst helping to retain a better bale shape by exerting a tighter grip around the bale circumference.

Plus, it reduces wastage of valuable silage wrap, as, unlike netwrap, no baled fodder can become enmeshed in it.”

Its production from the same base material as balewrap means users don’t have to separate the Baletite from balewrap after use.

Instead, both Baletite and the accompanying balewrap can be recycled together thereby saving valuable time and labour costs.

Baletite bales benefit from an enhanced ensiling process resulting in better crop conservation thanks

to the increased oxygen barrier afforded by the extra film layers around the bale circumference.

As a pre-orientated film manufactured using blown film co-extrusion lines,

Baletite offers exceptional puncture resistance even with tough, stemmy forage crops.

Its ability to cover the bale from edge to edge offers additional protection around the edge of the bale - especially useful when baling stalky crops.

Baletite exerts a tight grip around the bale circumference to compress content and expel oxygen faster.

Due to the high tightening force, Baletite creates tighter, more compact bales that benefit from a more rounded shape.

. The RPC bpi agriculture group employs over 2,000 people, has a turnover of over £700 M and operations in 23 countries.

RPC bpi recycled products is a fully audited polythene reprocessor certified with ISO 9001, ISO14001, and OHSAS 18001.

  It is Europe’s largest polythene recycler and processes over 120,000 tonnes pa.

This covers LDPE and HDPE recycling and can be grouped into industrial, packaging and agricultural waste.  

Please check out https://bpiagriculture.com/sustainability/