2Minister H

Photo  shows Minister Heather Humphreys with the McAree Management Team of David Caraher, Vincent McAree, Brendan McAree, Claire McAree and Peter Richardson

McAree Engineering, has announced upwards of 30 new roles which they plan to fill early in 2020. 

The company which already employs 145 staff across its three factories in Ballinode and Carrickroe, North Monaghan made the announcement

a week after they signed a Strategic Partnership agreement with Kilnaleck based, Breffni Air.

“We have invested some €5M in facilities and new capability in the past 18 months and this will continue with an additional investment of €2m in 2020. 

With Breffni Air, we are commencing a long term HVAC ducting project  which will allow us to get the most from this investment and

we are absolutely delighted to  announce  these additional jobs for North Monaghan ” added Brendan McAree, Managing Director

Welcoming the announcement, Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation added

“Huge congratulations to McAree Engineering on this fantastic news, which will come as a huge boost to North Monaghan and the wider region. 

They are a shining light for homegrown rural businesses right across the country, proving that you don’t have to be in a big city to achieve big success. 

The positive impact that they have on the local area cannot be underestimated and I would like to wish Brendan and the team the very best in the exciting chapter ahead.”

Vincent McAree, Operations Director stated “we have collaborated with Breffni Air for almost 20 years on a number of projects so it made sense to formalise this arrangement. 

We share the same vision of excellence in engineering, have similar values and are both growing rapidly. 

This partnership will allow us to grow the businesses using each other’s complementary strengths. 

We will focus on major industrial HVAC projects which is the driver behind today’s job announcement and will collaborate on a range of new projects”.

HR Manager, Katharine Slowey advises “we have a range of roles available from Design Engineers, CNC Machine Operators,

Assembly Operatives and Fabrication Welders and, we are looking to fill them early in the New Year. 

We are also looking to improve the gender balance in McAree Engineering and would love to see more women apply for these roles. 

We are a 3rd generation family business and have a strong focus on health and safety whilst at the same time operating

a friendly work environment offering excellent rates of pay. 

We believe in ongoing training and offer all our team members the opportunity to work with high-end machines and equipment. 

Full details of the roles are available on our website www.mcaree-eng.com.

Editor’s Note

McAree Engineering has been based in Ballinode since 1946 when the company was set up by Brendan’s father, Vince. 

They are best known for designing and manufacturing the V-Mac Silo range of Bulk storage solutions mainly for the agricultural sector. 

While this is an important part of the business, it accounts for only around 20% of turnover.

They have invested euro millions in state of the art lasers and press brakes, operating one of the most modern suites of sheet metalworking machinery in Ireland and Britain.

They supply components into leading Own Equipment Manufacturers across the island of Ireland in the quarrying and screening, materials handling and agricultural machinery sector.

2Cow on point of calving

   

 

Without urgent corrective action, some dairy and suckler beef herds will face calving problems over the next three months

as a legacy of plentiful high-quality grass last summer, according to Dr Elizabeth Berry BVSC, PhD, MRCVS, Veterinary Director with Animax.

She says a recent and widespread rise in calving difficulties identified by the Scottish Agriculture College (SAC) adviser Basil Lowman

indicates that many cows are carrying surplus weight into late pregnancy. The SAC in Scotland is the equivalent of Teagasc

Research from Teagasc shows that as BCS (body condition scores) increases above moderate levels, calving difficulty can increase.

This occurs as over-conditioned cows have increased calving difficulty due to fat being deposited in the pelvic area.

According to Teagasc, cows with a BCS >3 can afford to lose between 0.5 and 1.0 BCS through restricting the allowance of good-quality silage

or farmers can feed moderate-quality (65% DMD) silage ad-lib or dilute the energy of the diet by incorporating straw.

Very thin cows have increased calving problems.

This is due to insufficient strength to withstand the birth process and giving birth to weak, non-vigorous calves.

Thin cows need to be prioritised and allowed free access to good-quality silage and/or supplemented with concentrate,

where good-quality silage is not readily available.

To avert problems before they arise, Elizabeth advises farmers to focus on body condition scores and trace element supplementation leading up to and during the dry period.

But before making any changes, she insists that farmers discuss them with their vet or specialist feed adviser.

For trace element status, Elizabeth Berry says all farmers will know from past experience whether their soils are copper deficient and that supplementation is needed.

"But for other trace elements, it isn't as obvious," she says. "Many deficiencies are subclinical and not easily noticed.

Among the losses they cause are calving difficulties, weak calves, impaired fertility and reduced milk production."

Among a variety of methods including drenches, free access licks or in-feed powders,

Elizabeth suggests that continuous-release, long-duration supplementation is easy and reliable.

"For example, Tracesure cattle boluses lodge in the base of the rumen, releasing a trickle-charge of essential selenium, cobalt and iodine,

with or without copper depending on the farmer's choice, for up to six months ."

She reports that farmers' comments are typically encouraging: "Since giving these boluses at drying off," said one such,

"our cows are in much better condition at re-breeding three to four months later. As a result, the herd calving interval has certainly improved."

All Animax boluses have been independently trialled by Teagasc.

For further information please visit https://animax-vet.com/products/roi/

or contact Rory Dicker, Commercial Manager, Tel: 087 063 5950   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

2 Full House

‘Living Your New Normal’ Building your life to continue farming after an accident

Embrace FARM, farm accident support network, in conjunction with the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Dun Laoghaire held its first joint information day

to support people that have survived an accident and want to adjust their lives so they can keep farming.

The objective of the day was to highlight to accident survivors what organisations and businesses are out there to help them.

Showcase to the wider community what issues people face following an accident with their health and wellbeing

and finally identify opportunities for farmers to interact with companies and organisations that can

help them physically, mentally and emotionally adapt to life following their accident.

With over 100 people in attendance at the event, which was held at the Hub, Kilkenny, it attracted people from all over the country to come.

Support organisations such as Headway (Acquired Brain Injury), Samaritans, Awareness Head to Toe, Citizens Information, APOS, Pieta House,

IACP, Teagasc, IFA, ICSA, ICMSA, FBD, Coloplast, Wheelchair Cars Ireland, Irish Wheelchair Association,

Southeast Mobility Driving, National Learning Network,

and Employability gave their time and expertise to be present on the day to help all in attendance.

With adaptations from Mobility Tractor Steps, Third Arm, Pat O’Donnell Plant Hire and more,

there was a both a practical showcase of machinery and cars as well as the softer supports a person requires to rehabilitate after an accident.

Speakers on the day came from both a national and international perspective. Bill Fields from Perdue University, Indiana, USA and Agrability,

a programme ‘that provides assistance to farmers, other agricultural workers and family farm members impacted by disability’

spoke on the number of people they assist through training networking and other special events. Enda Murphy, author of ‘Five Steps to Happiness’

and psychotherapist spoke about the impact of trauma on our lives, how this can be recognised and awareness for those around us.

People had the opportunity to speak openly with one another and directly to the support organisations in attendance.

It was highlighted from one of the attendees that ‘help on the farm so that (we) could forget about it

in those first weeks/months’ was all-important to a person after an accident.

Another attendee mentioned the most benefit they received from the day was ‘being able

to talk about it to people who have experienced it’ i.e. surviving an accident.

For others it was something practical when asked what most benefited them in attending was ‘seeing an easier way to access a tractor’.

For the support organisations in attendance, they felt it was a ‘great opportunity to get our message out to offer support’ for the farming communities.

It was also felt that ‘attending this event was well worthwhile in regard to networking and hearing the individual human experiences

in particular’ when listening to the panel discussion held at the beginning of the day.

Claire McCormack from Agriland chaired an in-depth discussion with farm accident survivors Gabriel  Cronnelly, Leas-Chathaoirleach, Galway Co. Council

and Peter Gohery a Galway farmer sharing their stories of their accidents and the impact this has had on their lives and relationships with their loved ones.

Dr Maeve Nolan from the National Rehabilitation Hospital spoke from her perspective with

the patients they receive through their doors annually having survived such serious accidents.

It is hoped that this day will continue with conversations to help farm accident survivors in

a greater practical sense between all those who attended and kindly helped make this day happen.

 For more info please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / phone 085 – 7709966